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Guillermo Yrizar Barbosa

Ph.D. candidate in sociology, The Graduate Center, City University of New York

Residency: September – December 2017

Research Project: Papers, places, and familias: Tracing the social mobility of Mexicans in New York

Research Interests: Mexicans in the U.S., migration policies, state-diaspora relations, immigrant illegality, ethnography, demography, urban sociology, regional studies

Biography

Guillermo is a Ph.D. candidate in sociology at City University of New York (CUNY) Graduate Center. He received a B.A. in political science from Tec de Monterrey and a master’s degree in regional development from El Colegio de la Frontera Norte. Between 2008 and 2011, he worked for the Seminar on International Migration, the Migration Surveys in the North and South Borders of Mexico, the Mexican Migration Field Research Program and collective projects on the human rights of migrants. He is a student fellow at the CUNY Institute for Demographic Research and collaborates as data manager in Mexican Initiative for Deferred Action (MIDA) at Baruch College.

His dissertation focuses on the social mobility and family life of parents born in Mexico and living in three different counties in New York (Queens, the Bronx and the East End of Long Island Suffolk County). The main research question in this project is: Why and how do certain undocumented immigrants and their families do better than others in terms of occupations, educational attainment and family-household income? The bulk of his data comes from ethnographic cases of undocumented Mexicans identified since 2014 and ongoing work in the MIDA project.  

Before residing in Queens for over five years, Guillermo was a guest scholar at University of Notre Dame and research assistant at El Colegio de la Frontera Norte in Tijuana. His research work has been supported by CONACYT and Fulbright-García Robles, as well as by the Advanced Research Collaborative, the Center for Latin American, Caribbean and Latino Studies and more recently by the Gittell Collective at CUNY.