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A country once dominated by infectious diseases that go hand in hand with poverty, Mexico now increasingly suffers from the chronic diseases that plague the developed world. Government investment in clinics and hospitals has significantly extended health infrastructure, and health care provision is largely the domain of five separate and decentralized public health systems. However, the country’s changing epidemiological profile means that improving health outcomes requires dramatic increases in the complexity and quality of care that patients receive.

This project aims to support meeting this challenge by providing a basis for analysis of efforts to reduce inequality in access to care and increase efficiency of health care systems. It also enables the exploration of the political economy of mortality as a reflection of state capacity and democratization in Mexico. Data are offered on mortality rates and years of life lost by gender at the state and municipal level based on a reclassification of cause of death for 8 million death certificates in Mexico from 1998 to 2013.  

In this work, we used publicly-available data, including population estimates and life expectancy from the Consejo Nacional de Poblacion, death certificates from the Sistema Nacional de Informacion en Salud, live births from the Instituto Nacional de Estadistica y Geografia, and life tables from the World Health Organization. Our reclassification of causes of death uses the Global Burden of Disease methodology created by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation.

Here, we offer an interactive map and data visualizations that illustrate patterns of mortality for different age groups, genders and places over time. These efforts empower patients, practitioners and policymakers by transforming multiple datasets into easily accessible and comprehensible tools.


Diaz-Cayeros, Alberto, A. Egan, M. Floca, J. Furszyfer, M. Gell-Redman, L. Gomez Morin, Z. Razu. “Atlas of Epidemiological Transition in Mexico.” Center for U.S.-Mexican Studies, 2017.

This project was carried out in collaboration with Stanford University and Mexico Evalua and made possible by the generous support of the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. The maps and data visualizations were created by Nicholas Burkhart and Sebastian Garrido.